Posts tagged ‘dialogue’

March 4, 2011

Alpha/Omega…Breeding Ideas

People have currency in their day-to-day exchanges. Regardless of the unemployment rate or amount of consumer confidence in the marketplace, people think about how to make do.

Think. Make. Do.

These commonplace and everyday activities are imperative for each and all, he and she, you and me. We can and must accomplish such things daily. Within these simple imperatives, we have much to learn from one another—more than our current educational systems allow for. Likewise, we have much to teach one another—more than we give ourselves credit for.

Learn. Teach.

Three wayward warps of thinking, making, doing. Two willful wefts of learning and teaching. The fabric of community is created through the conscientious and capricious interlacing of our thoughts and activities.

Having room to think and a chance to act is less readily available than perhaps it should be. Such room is either a commodity, available at a price, or a fleeting space hard won from our daily work habits, snatched from the bustling elbows of the everyday. It is very difficult to think, make and do when constrained by our circumstances. We wait for an opening and jump at opportunities to think, make, do, and be together. Or, perhaps if we are privileged enough, we swallow the price of formal education and buy ourselves some time and space to think.

The Wayward School is the notion of school itself become wayward, and so proclaims that the seat of knowledge is to be found wherever you pull up a chair and whenever you choose to be with others who listen to and learn from one another. In backyards and living rooms, on street corners and sidewalks, in galleries and theatres, cafes and kitchens, bookstores and libraries, workshops and studios, churches and temples, community halls and board rooms, gardens and parks–we will meet and exchange thoughts, actions and projects. Together.

By teaching each other and sharing resources and ideas with one another outside of formal institutional settings such as universities, colleges and trade schools, we make the most of what we’ve already got. The more the merrier, and to that end, the Wayward School seeks to develop an expansive platform of co-operatively facilitated workshops, seminars, and community gatherings—a commonplace common space, a thinking breathing fellowship full of purpose and festivity.

We need each other now more than ever, because we work better when we work together. And so we will drift and settle and drift again to occupy the here, there, and everywhere we can find a nook or cranny to settle in…we shall gather and draw crowds…we shall expound, deliberate, and query…we shall learn new tricks and old ones too…we shall think…we shall make…we shall do…and we hope you will come and participate too.

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February 16, 2011

5…Minds Not Made Up

We’ve been talking to lots of people these days, lots of people with lots of ideas and opinions and talents… and uncertainties and fears and ineptitudes, too. Lots of people have something to say and know how to say it. Lots of people have something to say but aren’t sure how to express it. And lots and lots of people won’t easily open their mouths to speak unless they feel they can speak with some degree of authority on the subject.

We’ve been thinking a lot about how to best facilitate conversations that are really productive but not instrumental, respectful but not PC, safe but not boring, provocative but not inflammatory. We’re now of the opinion that one way to go about nurturing such a space is to ask people to come to the discussion or the workshop or the party without their minds made up. This single all-encompassing rule can speak to all those latent desires (to know and show oneself knowing, to have principles that stand the test of time, to be heard, to be understood, to be looked up to) that tend to manifest themselves as conversation-killers. What is a dead conversation if not a stagnant discussion in which the rigidities of minds made up have occasioned still ponds (lifeless, anaerobic, idle) instead of flowing waterways (always moving, always circulating, always refreshing)? Even though this analogy can only take us so far, since even anaerobic activity is ultimately transformative and creative, we think you get the picture.

Like the Oracle of Delphi and its two entrance inscriptions, “know thyself” and “nothing in excess” (a/k/a “everything in moderation”), the line “minds not made up” shall be unwritten above the entrance to every Wayward event. Think of our adage as the unwritten inscription, compounding the Oracle’s two inscriptions to read: know oneself in moderation.

We read the relation between the two inscriptions as such: the assurances of a made up mind must be tempered by the moderating effect of the community of others; the introspective act of making one’s mind up about oneself can only ever be but a training ground for the arena of dialogue, discussion and disagreement that one enters into with others; the shared cosmos and assembly of people, place and things (the political dance of nouns) is best composed under conditions of moderation wherein minorities are not excluded from participation with the many, and neither do a select few rule over the multitude.

Having one’s mind made up, is like selective reading: passing over the persons, places and things with whom or with which one cannot find common ground (without looking a little harder); immoderately reading the social terrain for its most comfortable passages (wearing those trails thin with obsessive movement); seeking allies in friends (but never in adversaries). And those things won’t get us anywhere, so come with minds not made up and we’ll see where that takes us for a change.

Liberty and Learning